Shoppers lose their minds over a VERY strange sight in the fries section at a Sydney service station

Would you eat this snack on the road? Shoppers lose their minds over a VERY strange sight in the fries section at a Sydney service station

  • A whole food specialist has criticized the idea of ​​people in Australia eating insects
  • He saw crickets and worms available on the shelf at his local gas station.
  • The woman’s friends on social media agreed: They said they wouldn’t eat bugs.

Shoppers are left speechless after noticing dried crickets and worms for sale in the chip aisle at a gas station, with many saying ‘crunchy bugs’ are too far away.

Whole food business owner Soulla Chamberlain spotted the creepy crawlies on the shelf of a Sydney petrol station.

But despite her understanding of food trends in the health food space, the businesswoman couldn’t imagine eating bugs.

Shoppers are left speechless after noticing dried crickets and worms for sale in the chip aisle at a gas station, with many saying 'crunchy bugs' are too far away

Shoppers are left speechless after noticing dried crickets and worms for sale in the chip aisle at a gas station, with many saying ‘crunchy bugs’ are too far away

“Now we can buy cricket and worm snacks at our local gas station,” he said.

“I think people in third world countries would be thinking something like, ‘You mean privileged Westerners have access to grass-fed beef, grass-fed eggs, wild-caught fish, and whole dairy and CHOOSE to eat insects instead? ?!’

Edible insects, such as crickets, are a delicacy in the developed world, as well as in developing countries in Africa and Asia.

In recent years they have become known in Australia as a good source of protein and other vitamins.

‘Am I missing something? Not to mention all the other crap that’s listed in the ingredients,” she said, pointing to the flavor enhancers on the side of the package.

And she wasn’t the only person outraged by the snacks.

“Make it stop,” one woman wrote on the post.

While another asked where the photo was taken, he added a sick emoji to his comment.

“Randwick Service Station,” he said, explaining that the product was found in the affluent eastern suburbs.

The weirdos were found on the shelf of a Sydney petrol station by Soulla Chamberlain, owner of a whole foods business.

The weirdos were found on the shelf of a Sydney petrol station by Soulla Chamberlain, owner of a whole foods business.

“That’s a big no from me,” said another.

While a third asked: ‘Are people really stupid enough to eat this?’

“Plastic wrapped, industrially processed parasites – the nastiest and most environmentally disgusting product to hit our shelves yet,” said another.

Poll

Would you buy crickets or worms in a bag?

Others said they would consider eating insects.

‘It’s the additives that get me, yuck! We already eat invertebrates only those that live under the sea. I’m not saying I’d jump at the chance to eat a bug, but maybe we’re unnecessarily apprehensive because of our conditioning.

More than 100 people commented on the post, most of them unsure about the idea of ​​eating the bugs.

But some people have built their entire healthy lifestyle around choosing sustainable protein, telling FEMAIL that eating bugs is the way of the future.

Personal trainers Suji Yoo and Alessandro Ranieri are always looking for new and delicious foods to try and they couldn’t believe it when they stumbled upon the creepy crawlies and enjoyed them.

“They taste exactly like shrimp when you eat them whole, and you can grind them into a powder that goes well with everything, even burgers,” Alessandro said.

Personal trainers Suji Yoo and Alessandro Ranieri eat crickets for their high protein value and have a mostly plant-based diet.

Personal trainers Suji Yoo and Alessandro Ranieri eat crickets for their high protein value and have a mostly plant-based diet.

More on eating crickets:

Entomophagy, or eating insects, is a practice that dates back to prehistoric times.

Crickets are one of the most common insects consumed by people. Products containing cricket protein have gained popularity due to consumer demand for more sustainable protein options.

Insects like crickets are rich in nutrients, especially protein, and may be more sustainable than other protein sources, such as beef.

BENEFITS

There are a number of benefits to eating crickets.

Crickets may offer health benefits and provide a more sustainable and environmentally friendly source of protein than other animal-based protein sources.

Studies show that cricket protein powder contains approximately 65.5% protein, with adult crickets providing 13.2 to 20.3 grams of protein per 100-gram serving.

Protein is more difficult to digest than animal protein but easier than plant protein.

In addition to protein, crickets are high in many other nutrients, including fat, calcium, potassium, zinc, magnesium, copper, folic acid, biotin, pantothenic acid, and iron.

One study found that the iron content of crickets was 180% higher than that of beef. Additionally, crickets had more calcium and the B vitamin riboflavin than meat products such as chicken, pork, and beef.

Source: HEALTH LINE

Good-quality crickets cost $250 a pound, but they are so packed with nutrients and protein that you have to eat far less than you would from any other high-protein ingredient, they explained.

Now they are feeding their customers dishes like Australian curry and cricket ragout.

“People love crickets, they often rearrange them every time,” Alessandro said.

The couple are looking to add more bugs to their meal plan and they mentioned that mealworms could be next on the menu.

Commercial

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*